TLRP & ESRC  
  home  news  search  vre  contact  sitemap
 AIMS
 FINDINGS
 PROJECTS
 THEMES
 CAPACITY
 EVENTS
 PUBLICATIONS
 RESOURCES
USERS
 INTERNATIONAL
 MANAGEMENT
  
 Capacity building: developing researcher expertise
   
  Resource Contributors  TLRP Showcase
 
   
 

Overview Foundations  Qualitative Methods  Quantitative Methods  Mixed Methods  Impact

Mixed Methods

Mixed methods research is a description usually applied to research that combines qualitative and quantitative approaches. Listed below are:

  • TLRP's specially commissioned guides about mixed methods or about the ways in which a substantive focus has been researched using different methods and approaches
  • showcased TLRP projects' contributions to this issue
  • some additional resources

Guides

Name
Title
Delivery for posting
HEA (x3) Three approaches to researching feedback in HE (discourse analysis, experimentation, post-structural approaches)
14/10/07
Chris Taylor Resources from RCBN and RCBN Journal
14/11/07
UCET Teacher Education Reference Group Research on Teacher Education (substantive focus drawing on different methods)
14/10/07
Carrie Paechter Researching how children learn gender
14/11/07

 

TLRP Showcase: Mixed Methods
Learning and Professional Development: networks
TLRP Learning to Learn project .
Enhancing 'Skills for Life': Adult Basic Skills and Workplace Learning

Additional Resource

A paper by Jennifer Mason (2006), in The Real Life Methods Working Papers series, outlines different approaches to using mixed methods in six strategies for mixing methods and linking data , while a discussion paper on mixed methods research paper  by Julia Brannen (2005) offers definitions of and reasons for popularity of mixed methods research, as well as outlining how a mixed method strategy plays out in different phases of the research process.

Alan Bryman (2006) performs a content analysis on 232 social science articles to see how mixed methods were used in practice. On the quantitative side structured interview and questionnaire research within a cross-sectional design tended to predominate, while on the qualitative side the semi-structured interview within a cross-sectional design tended to predominate. The rationales for employing a mixed-methods research approach and how they were used in practice indicates did not always align, and the implications of this finding for thinking about mixed-methods research were considered. Bryman (2004) has also produced a Methods Briefing on Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Research: Prospects and Limits .

Forum: Qualitative Social Research  has published a special issue (Forum Volume 2, No. 1 – February 2001) on Qualitative and Quantitative Research: Conjunctions and Divergences .

References and further reading:

  • Bryman, A. (2006) ‘Integrating Quantitative and Qualitative Research: how is it done?' Qualitative Research, Vol. 6, No. 1: 97-114
  • Mason, J. (2006) ‘Mixing Methods in a Qualitatively-Driven Way', Qualitative Research, Vol. 6, No. 1: 9-26
  • Moran-Ellis, J., Alexander, V. D., Cronin, A., Dickinson, M., Fielding, J., Sleney, J. and Thomas, H., (2006) ‘Triangulation and Integration: processes, claims and
    implications' Qualitative Research, Vol. 6, No. 1: 45-60.
  • International Journal of Social Research Methodology (2005) Vol. 8, No. 3. Special edition on mixed methods research.

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 
homepage ESRC