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Overview Foundations  Qualitative Methods  Quantitative Methods  Mixed Methods  Impact

Quantitative Methods

Listed below are:

  • TLRP's specially commissioned guides to selected quantitative methods
  • showcased TLRP projects' contributions on quantitative methods
  • some additional resources

Guides

Name
Title
Delivery for posting
Stephen Gorard Experimental designs in educational research
14/10/07
Paul Lambe Using the Household Panel Survey
tbc
Terezinha Nunes and Peter Bryant Experiments in classrooms
14/11/07
Dave Pedder Design and use of a questionnaire on school staff values and practices (TLRP showcase)
14/11/07
Andy Tolmie Quantitative analysis of teacher-learner and learner-learner dialogues
14/10/07
Chris Taylor Resources from RCBN and the Journal
14/11/07
Sally Thomas Questionnaire data analysis (factors and regression)
14/11/07
Sally Thomas Value added analysis of pupil and school performance
14/10/07

 

TLRP Showcase: Quantitative Methods

Additional Resources

The 'Longitudinal Data Analysis for Social Science Researchers'  project, funded under the ESRC Researcher Development Initiative, produces a range of resources: for example, Paul Lambert (2006) has produced The British Household Panel Survey: Introduction to a longitudinal data resource [Working Paper 2 of ‘Longitudinal Data Analysis for Social Science Researchers', ESRC Researcher Development Initiative training programme]. The paper is intended to familiarise social scientists with the BHPS survey resource, to introduce the main practical issues as they are typically experienced by researchers new to the survey, and to provide some brief examples of analyses using the BHPS over a range of its data resources.

The Centre for Multilevel Modelling  has a range of resources on Multilevel Modelling made available as part of an ESRC funded initiative whose aims include " ... the development of statistical models for the analysis of hierarchically structured data, training in the use of such models, and the provision of appropriate software."

Steph Gray (2003) of MORI raises interesting questions around the implications for researchers of mixing quantitative survey methodologies: Is It Safe To Combine Methodologies In Survey Research? . Given different groups use different communication modes, one common approach is to use different modes of research for different audiences, combining the results from telephone, face-to-face, or self-completion postal/online questionnaires among the different survey populations. But what are the implications of combining different modes of research on the validity of the data that is gathered? How comparable are telephone and online surveys, and can the results of one ever be reliably combined with the other?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   

 

 
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