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 Education for all (home)

12cp

Part I: What is education for?
   
1. Challenge: Lessons from history are important. Very often, ‘we have been here before’.
  Principle: Ministers, political advisers, civil servants and educational professionals should acquaint themselves with recent history of education in order to build cumulatively on worthwhile successes and to avoid repeating mistakes.
2. Challenge: Aims of education are often spelt out solely in terms of economic utility and relevance.
 

Principle: Policy and frameworks of entitlement should reflect the broad aims of educating persons, such as:

  • understanding of the physical, social and economic worlds,
  • practical capabilities,
  • economic utility,
  • moral seriousness,
  • sense of community, collaboration and justice,
  • sense of fulfilment,
  • motivation to continue learning even to ‘the fourth age’.
3. Challenge: In responding to national priorities and in promoting ‘education for all’, policy must also reflect the diversity of social and economic conditions which affect learning.
  Principle: In pursuing educational aims, the system of education should recognise the significance of particular economic, social and personal circumstances, and thus enable flexible adaptation of curriculum, pedagogy and assessment to meet specific needs.
4. Challenge: Too easily the capacities of people to learn are seen, from early years to old age, to be strictly limited by nature.
  Principle: ‘Biology is not destiny’. Still more and better investment in the early years is crucial, but the brain remains adaptable from experiences and learning opportunities throughout life.

 

   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
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